Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

jstoldt
Hi everyone,

I did a quick follow up on what has been said and checked if it's possible to post via email in phpBB. Apparently, hacks for that have been made although they are probably ages old, hacky and prone to errors. See more here: http://area51.phpbb.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=24559

Either way, I still like the idea of using common bulletin board software. Receiving forum posts shouldn't be a problem for the developers. The only requirement would be to compose the notification emails in a way the new posts content is also added to the email. This can be a requirement for the system to be. IIRC, phpBB does not do that natively but there are plenty hacks for a lot of things in that software (e.g. http://www.phpbb.com/community/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=1095015 ). Only downside would be that devs would have to click the link and then the reply button (why not add a reply link in the email, too, saves a click!) to reply. Only downside compared to email replies I see here that a web browser that has the credentials saves is necessary and possibly another click will have to be made. Not saving the credentials obviously increases the number of steps and effort.

I would still like to point out that scrapping the Mailing List is not mandatory or can actually be unfortunate for other users who do not care for forum software either. OpenOffice.org has both so I think it is not too bad, although admittedly, XWiki is quite a lot smaller so having both might balance the load between list and board and in the end you have two semi-dead support channels. That is also ignoring that the support answers would be distributed among both, redundancies might increase and supporters would have to use either.

Now, another thing I would like to propose instead of switching to a board software at all is just disabling the requirement for subscription on the user list. I did actually post in this thread before the message that made it through because I thought I had already subscribed to this mailing list... apparently I had not. I later did but the post I made on nabble still was not accepted. My point being, while nabble presents a nice board like front end the registration and subscription bits are a bit messy unless you know exactly what you do. It is less intuitive than in most board systems and if you forget to change the mailing list settings you wind up being sent emails and emails you do not care for.

Lastly, I think marketing is very important in this regard. First of all, when I go to XWiki.org I see a large number of links on the right side. The ecosystem is pretty good, that one is supposed to hold all projects. But if I read further down I find a bulk of links, half of which I don't need if I am simple user who wants a bit of support. Besides, it is on the right side and like I discussed with some of you on the IRC channel, that is a bit confusing to many users who expect this to be on the left side. Anyway, I know this is WIP for you. Okay, so if I cared enough to read through all of that I get to the Support page, eventually. Here I find... more text. The links are well visible and the idea to make the user follow a scheme before asking is also understandable, while not very user oriented. I think that page should feature a number of larger buttons to go to the three most important pages which would be Forum, Mailing List and FAQ (in no particular order here). Below that you can still keep much of the current, IMO. Now, however, I probably get to MailingLists page and most of the page on my FullHD resolution is plastered with information about the Mailing Lists and rather tiny somewhere at the end there I see Forum. I am pointing out all of this because I remember how some of you on the IRC channel actually pointed out to me there is a way to view the lists like a Forum. Back to the third section... I see... another sentence, yet more reading to do before finally asking my question. Chances are I hit the Nabble link because I heard Nabble at some point in time and am sort of a quick clicker... which I am... which makes me fail because Nabble points to Nabble and not the XWiki Nabble Forum. If I finally got through to Nabble I now have to subscribe (2 steps), turn of the email delivery and then I can finally ask for support. Also note that the Support page on www.xwiki.org has no link to the IRC page either.

I got to go. Still hope this is a little useful to you.

Regards,
Johannes
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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

Andreas Hahn
In reply to this post by vmassol
Am 14.03.2011 09:16, schrieb Vincent Massol:

> On Mar 13, 2011, at 10:00 PM, Andreas Hahn wrote:
>
>> Am 10.03.2011 17:39, schrieb Paul Libbrecht:
>>> Please contradict me!
>> Paul,
>> actually - how could I do this ?
>> I'm not an expert in forum software so I'd to go for the naive approach
>> - comparing features e.t.c.
>>
>> I was hoping for some insight that it is beneficial for the whole
>> project to encourage users first to browse and then to participate -
>> even if it means  for you and the others around here to give up beloved
>> habits.
>>
>> Anyway - I'm not going to push you guys back to the future of Web 2.0.
>>
>> Given the lame participation when compared to the survey 4 years ago it
>> seems to me that quite some people have already left the boat and it may
>> not matter anymore.
> I'm not sure how to read your last 2 paragraphs.
>
> Just note that fro my POV there's no "you" and "me" here. There's only a global community and you're part of it. That said at some point some people are going to need to work to make it happen, this is where the distinction will happen. How far are you willing to help? Maybe a first step would be that you help find either a forum software that fits the bill or a hosted service that would work for us.
>
> > From the people who answered so far my feeling is that:
> * people seem to agree in general that at least for users a forum would be nicer
> * since xwiki committers provide a substantial amount of answers to the user list as of today it would be nice that they can continue to have the information coming to me

For my own FOSS project I'm hoping to start soon - I'll be going with
http://stackoverflow.com. Providing support means checking the site for
tagged questions a couple of times a day. It's just one mouse click. For
me it makes no real difference in getting mails or checking a forum as
long as you have a one-click list of open topics.

Gathering all the information about all possible options and criteria
can get very time consuming so I think we should try to rule out
something first.

Forums that are operated by other providers (getsatisfaction,
stackoverflow, ...) might
* be discontinued without warning (see jive)
* change their policy later (no more free forums)
* not expose user mail addresses and forum content (or might change that
policy) so you're locked in.
* not be as flexible as own forums if you want to change something (add
category, ...)

OTOH operating an own forum
* requires admin efforts (must be maintained and updated, backups, ...)
* may not be as publicly visible as that of other providers (because of
their advertisements ...)
* may not be as innovative as special forum operators ('awarding for
active participants', ...)

In addition there are concerns valid for both:
* Is it important to somehow import the existing mail archive ?

So IMO this is the first decision - is it ok to rely on somebody else ?
and then decide which one.

I'd be ok to spend time on it once its clear which way to go.
However - as for me - nothing will happen fast as beside of my daily
work I already have a side project so this is kind of
side-project-side-project.

Now for getsatisfaction - I don't know anything about it except that
what can be found on their site.
They don't seem to offer free accounts for open source. I've also seen
no indication you can get mail alerts for new contributions.

So how do we approach this ?

bye
Andreas

> My personal POV is indeed that I'd like a forum for both the participation part (ie awarding status/points to active participants to surface them) and the categorization part but indeed I don't see myself going to the forum so it has to come to me. I think this is easy to achieve since on forums like getsatisfaction you can subscribe to the whole forum and thus receive all posts. What would be even better is if I could post or reply by replying to the mail.
>
> Now back to getsatisfaction I think before we could use it we'd need to check:
> * are there any limitations for free open source forums? What's their position on open source?
> * how can we get all the posts in a neutral and standard format should we want to move to another tool later on?
>
> Thanks
> -Vincent
>
> _______________________________________________
> users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
>

_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

Thibaut Camberlin
Hi,

IMO it makes a lot of sense to use a forum solution for users (when it does
not for devs). When I was working with WordPress software, I was reading a
lot forum threads (they are using their other product, bbPress). I wouldn't
have thought about subscribing to a mailing list, I didn't even know they
existed. I was not Open Source minded, so are a lot of people using XWiki
and willing to contribute good feedback. A forum is so much easier to read
(topics, dates, tags, rates) and much less geek.

I am +1 for a forum solution for users.

--
Thibaut

On Mon, Mar 14, 2011 at 11:33 AM, Andreas Hahn <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Am 14.03.2011 09:16, schrieb Vincent Massol:
> > On Mar 13, 2011, at 10:00 PM, Andreas Hahn wrote:
> >
> >> Am 10.03.2011 17:39, schrieb Paul Libbrecht:
> >>> Please contradict me!
> >> Paul,
> >> actually - how could I do this ?
> >> I'm not an expert in forum software so I'd to go for the naive approach
> >> - comparing features e.t.c.
> >>
> >> I was hoping for some insight that it is beneficial for the whole
> >> project to encourage users first to browse and then to participate -
> >> even if it means  for you and the others around here to give up beloved
> >> habits.
> >>
> >> Anyway - I'm not going to push you guys back to the future of Web 2.0.
> >>
> >> Given the lame participation when compared to the survey 4 years ago it
> >> seems to me that quite some people have already left the boat and it may
> >> not matter anymore.
> > I'm not sure how to read your last 2 paragraphs.
> >
> > Just note that fro my POV there's no "you" and "me" here. There's only a
> global community and you're part of it. That said at some point some people
> are going to need to work to make it happen, this is where the distinction
> will happen. How far are you willing to help? Maybe a first step would be
> that you help find either a forum software that fits the bill or a hosted
> service that would work for us.
> >
> > > From the people who answered so far my feeling is that:
> > * people seem to agree in general that at least for users a forum would
> be nicer
> > * since xwiki committers provide a substantial amount of answers to the
> user list as of today it would be nice that they can continue to have the
> information coming to me
>
> For my own FOSS project I'm hoping to start soon - I'll be going with
> http://stackoverflow.com. Providing support means checking the site for
> tagged questions a couple of times a day. It's just one mouse click. For
> me it makes no real difference in getting mails or checking a forum as
> long as you have a one-click list of open topics.
>
> Gathering all the information about all possible options and criteria
> can get very time consuming so I think we should try to rule out
> something first.
>
> Forums that are operated by other providers (getsatisfaction,
> stackoverflow, ...) might
> * be discontinued without warning (see jive)
> * change their policy later (no more free forums)
> * not expose user mail addresses and forum content (or might change that
> policy) so you're locked in.
> * not be as flexible as own forums if you want to change something (add
> category, ...)
>
> OTOH operating an own forum
> * requires admin efforts (must be maintained and updated, backups, ...)
> * may not be as publicly visible as that of other providers (because of
> their advertisements ...)
> * may not be as innovative as special forum operators ('awarding for
> active participants', ...)
>
> In addition there are concerns valid for both:
> * Is it important to somehow import the existing mail archive ?
>
> So IMO this is the first decision - is it ok to rely on somebody else ?
> and then decide which one.
>
> I'd be ok to spend time on it once its clear which way to go.
> However - as for me - nothing will happen fast as beside of my daily
> work I already have a side project so this is kind of
> side-project-side-project.
>
> Now for getsatisfaction - I don't know anything about it except that
> what can be found on their site.
> They don't seem to offer free accounts for open source. I've also seen
> no indication you can get mail alerts for new contributions.
>
> So how do we approach this ?
>
> bye
> Andreas
>
> > My personal POV is indeed that I'd like a forum for both the
> participation part (ie awarding status/points to active participants to
> surface them) and the categorization part but indeed I don't see myself
> going to the forum so it has to come to me. I think this is easy to achieve
> since on forums like getsatisfaction you can subscribe to the whole forum
> and thus receive all posts. What would be even better is if I could post or
> reply by replying to the mail.
> >
> > Now back to getsatisfaction I think before we could use it we'd need to
> check:
> > * are there any limitations for free open source forums? What's their
> position on open source?
> > * how can we get all the posts in a neutral and standard format should we
> want to move to another tool later on?
> >
> > Thanks
> > -Vincent
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > users mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
>
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

Paul Libbrecht-2
Thibault,

we're still looking for a solution that would support those "older users".... you know, the grouches that still prefer to send an email than to open a browser.
Differently formulated: give us a web-forum that plays well with the mail both ways (and I would prefer this to be java but that's just me).

paul


Le 17 mars 2011 à 20:23, Thibaut Camberlin a écrit :

> Hi,
>
> IMO it makes a lot of sense to use a forum solution for users (when it does
> not for devs). When I was working with WordPress software, I was reading a
> lot forum threads (they are using their other product, bbPress). I wouldn't
> have thought about subscribing to a mailing list, I didn't even know they
> existed. I was not Open Source minded, so are a lot of people using XWiki
> and willing to contribute good feedback. A forum is so much easier to read
> (topics, dates, tags, rates) and much less geek.
>
> I am +1 for a forum solution for users.
>
> --
> Thibaut
>
> On Mon, Mar 14, 2011 at 11:33 AM, Andreas Hahn <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Am 14.03.2011 09:16, schrieb Vincent Massol:
>>> On Mar 13, 2011, at 10:00 PM, Andreas Hahn wrote:
>>>
>>>> Am 10.03.2011 17:39, schrieb Paul Libbrecht:
>>>>> Please contradict me!
>>>> Paul,
>>>> actually - how could I do this ?
>>>> I'm not an expert in forum software so I'd to go for the naive approach
>>>> - comparing features e.t.c.
>>>>
>>>> I was hoping for some insight that it is beneficial for the whole
>>>> project to encourage users first to browse and then to participate -
>>>> even if it means  for you and the others around here to give up beloved
>>>> habits.
>>>>
>>>> Anyway - I'm not going to push you guys back to the future of Web 2.0.
>>>>
>>>> Given the lame participation when compared to the survey 4 years ago it
>>>> seems to me that quite some people have already left the boat and it may
>>>> not matter anymore.
>>> I'm not sure how to read your last 2 paragraphs.
>>>
>>> Just note that fro my POV there's no "you" and "me" here. There's only a
>> global community and you're part of it. That said at some point some people
>> are going to need to work to make it happen, this is where the distinction
>> will happen. How far are you willing to help? Maybe a first step would be
>> that you help find either a forum software that fits the bill or a hosted
>> service that would work for us.
>>>
>>>> From the people who answered so far my feeling is that:
>>> * people seem to agree in general that at least for users a forum would
>> be nicer
>>> * since xwiki committers provide a substantial amount of answers to the
>> user list as of today it would be nice that they can continue to have the
>> information coming to me
>>
>> For my own FOSS project I'm hoping to start soon - I'll be going with
>> http://stackoverflow.com. Providing support means checking the site for
>> tagged questions a couple of times a day. It's just one mouse click. For
>> me it makes no real difference in getting mails or checking a forum as
>> long as you have a one-click list of open topics.
>>
>> Gathering all the information about all possible options and criteria
>> can get very time consuming so I think we should try to rule out
>> something first.
>>
>> Forums that are operated by other providers (getsatisfaction,
>> stackoverflow, ...) might
>> * be discontinued without warning (see jive)
>> * change their policy later (no more free forums)
>> * not expose user mail addresses and forum content (or might change that
>> policy) so you're locked in.
>> * not be as flexible as own forums if you want to change something (add
>> category, ...)
>>
>> OTOH operating an own forum
>> * requires admin efforts (must be maintained and updated, backups, ...)
>> * may not be as publicly visible as that of other providers (because of
>> their advertisements ...)
>> * may not be as innovative as special forum operators ('awarding for
>> active participants', ...)
>>
>> In addition there are concerns valid for both:
>> * Is it important to somehow import the existing mail archive ?
>>
>> So IMO this is the first decision - is it ok to rely on somebody else ?
>> and then decide which one.
>>
>> I'd be ok to spend time on it once its clear which way to go.
>> However - as for me - nothing will happen fast as beside of my daily
>> work I already have a side project so this is kind of
>> side-project-side-project.
>>
>> Now for getsatisfaction - I don't know anything about it except that
>> what can be found on their site.
>> They don't seem to offer free accounts for open source. I've also seen
>> no indication you can get mail alerts for new contributions.
>>
>> So how do we approach this ?
>>
>> bye
>> Andreas
>>
>>> My personal POV is indeed that I'd like a forum for both the
>> participation part (ie awarding status/points to active participants to
>> surface them) and the categorization part but indeed I don't see myself
>> going to the forum so it has to come to me. I think this is easy to achieve
>> since on forums like getsatisfaction you can subscribe to the whole forum
>> and thus receive all posts. What would be even better is if I could post or
>> reply by replying to the mail.
>>>
>>> Now back to getsatisfaction I think before we could use it we'd need to
>> check:
>>> * are there any limitations for free open source forums? What's their
>> position on open source?
>>> * how can we get all the posts in a neutral and standard format should we
>> want to move to another tool later on?
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> -Vincent
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> users mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
>>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> users mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
>>
> _______________________________________________
> users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users

_______________________________________________
users mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

vmassol
Administrator
In reply to this post by Thibaut Camberlin

On Mar 17, 2011, at 8:23 PM, Thibaut Camberlin wrote:

> Hi,
>
> IMO it makes a lot of sense to use a forum solution for users (when it does
> not for devs). When I was working with WordPress software, I was reading a
> lot forum threads (they are using their other product, bbPress). I wouldn't
> have thought about subscribing to a mailing list, I didn't even know they
> existed. I was not Open Source minded, so are a lot of people using XWiki
> and willing to contribute good feedback. A forum is so much easier to read
> (topics, dates, tags, rates) and much less geek.

Thibaut we *already have* a forum...

Your argument isn't quite valid since you also need to subscribe in a forum to post!

If you just want to browse the list: http://xwiki.markmail.org

Thanks
-Vincent

> I am +1 for a forum solution for users.
>
> --
> Thibaut
>
> On Mon, Mar 14, 2011 at 11:33 AM, Andreas Hahn <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Am 14.03.2011 09:16, schrieb Vincent Massol:
>>> On Mar 13, 2011, at 10:00 PM, Andreas Hahn wrote:
>>>
>>>> Am 10.03.2011 17:39, schrieb Paul Libbrecht:
>>>>> Please contradict me!
>>>> Paul,
>>>> actually - how could I do this ?
>>>> I'm not an expert in forum software so I'd to go for the naive approach
>>>> - comparing features e.t.c.
>>>>
>>>> I was hoping for some insight that it is beneficial for the whole
>>>> project to encourage users first to browse and then to participate -
>>>> even if it means  for you and the others around here to give up beloved
>>>> habits.
>>>>
>>>> Anyway - I'm not going to push you guys back to the future of Web 2.0.
>>>>
>>>> Given the lame participation when compared to the survey 4 years ago it
>>>> seems to me that quite some people have already left the boat and it may
>>>> not matter anymore.
>>> I'm not sure how to read your last 2 paragraphs.
>>>
>>> Just note that fro my POV there's no "you" and "me" here. There's only a
>> global community and you're part of it. That said at some point some people
>> are going to need to work to make it happen, this is where the distinction
>> will happen. How far are you willing to help? Maybe a first step would be
>> that you help find either a forum software that fits the bill or a hosted
>> service that would work for us.
>>>
>>>> From the people who answered so far my feeling is that:
>>> * people seem to agree in general that at least for users a forum would
>> be nicer
>>> * since xwiki committers provide a substantial amount of answers to the
>> user list as of today it would be nice that they can continue to have the
>> information coming to me
>>
>> For my own FOSS project I'm hoping to start soon - I'll be going with
>> http://stackoverflow.com. Providing support means checking the site for
>> tagged questions a couple of times a day. It's just one mouse click. For
>> me it makes no real difference in getting mails or checking a forum as
>> long as you have a one-click list of open topics.
>>
>> Gathering all the information about all possible options and criteria
>> can get very time consuming so I think we should try to rule out
>> something first.
>>
>> Forums that are operated by other providers (getsatisfaction,
>> stackoverflow, ...) might
>> * be discontinued without warning (see jive)
>> * change their policy later (no more free forums)
>> * not expose user mail addresses and forum content (or might change that
>> policy) so you're locked in.
>> * not be as flexible as own forums if you want to change something (add
>> category, ...)
>>
>> OTOH operating an own forum
>> * requires admin efforts (must be maintained and updated, backups, ...)
>> * may not be as publicly visible as that of other providers (because of
>> their advertisements ...)
>> * may not be as innovative as special forum operators ('awarding for
>> active participants', ...)
>>
>> In addition there are concerns valid for both:
>> * Is it important to somehow import the existing mail archive ?
>>
>> So IMO this is the first decision - is it ok to rely on somebody else ?
>> and then decide which one.
>>
>> I'd be ok to spend time on it once its clear which way to go.
>> However - as for me - nothing will happen fast as beside of my daily
>> work I already have a side project so this is kind of
>> side-project-side-project.
>>
>> Now for getsatisfaction - I don't know anything about it except that
>> what can be found on their site.
>> They don't seem to offer free accounts for open source. I've also seen
>> no indication you can get mail alerts for new contributions.
>>
>> So how do we approach this ?
>>
>> bye
>> Andreas
>>
>>> My personal POV is indeed that I'd like a forum for both the
>> participation part (ie awarding status/points to active participants to
>> surface them) and the categorization part but indeed I don't see myself
>> going to the forum so it has to come to me. I think this is easy to achieve
>> since on forums like getsatisfaction you can subscribe to the whole forum
>> and thus receive all posts. What would be even better is if I could post or
>> reply by replying to the mail.
>>>
>>> Now back to getsatisfaction I think before we could use it we'd need to
>> check:
>>> * are there any limitations for free open source forums? What's their
>> position on open source?
>>> * how can we get all the posts in a neutral and standard format should we
>> want to move to another tool later on?
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> -Vincent
_______________________________________________
users mailing list
[hidden email]
http://lists.xwiki.org/mailman/listinfo/users
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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

vmassol
Administrator
In reply to this post by Andreas Hahn

On Mar 14, 2011, at 11:33 AM, Andreas Hahn wrote:

> Am 14.03.2011 09:16, schrieb Vincent Massol:
>> On Mar 13, 2011, at 10:00 PM, Andreas Hahn wrote:
>>
>>> Am 10.03.2011 17:39, schrieb Paul Libbrecht:
>>>> Please contradict me!
>>> Paul,
>>> actually - how could I do this ?
>>> I'm not an expert in forum software so I'd to go for the naive approach
>>> - comparing features e.t.c.
>>>
>>> I was hoping for some insight that it is beneficial for the whole
>>> project to encourage users first to browse and then to participate -
>>> even if it means  for you and the others around here to give up beloved
>>> habits.
>>>
>>> Anyway - I'm not going to push you guys back to the future of Web 2.0.
>>>
>>> Given the lame participation when compared to the survey 4 years ago it
>>> seems to me that quite some people have already left the boat and it may
>>> not matter anymore.
>> I'm not sure how to read your last 2 paragraphs.
>>
>> Just note that fro my POV there's no "you" and "me" here. There's only a global community and you're part of it. That said at some point some people are going to need to work to make it happen, this is where the distinction will happen. How far are you willing to help? Maybe a first step would be that you help find either a forum software that fits the bill or a hosted service that would work for us.
>>
>> > From the people who answered so far my feeling is that:
>> * people seem to agree in general that at least for users a forum would be nicer
>> * since xwiki committers provide a substantial amount of answers to the user list as of today it would be nice that they can continue to have the information coming to me
>
> For my own FOSS project I'm hoping to start soon - I'll be going with http://stackoverflow.com. Providing support means checking the site for tagged questions a couple of times a day. It's just one mouse click. For me it makes no real difference in getting mails or checking a forum as long as you have a one-click list of open topics.

[snip]

Well, stackoverflow.com is one global site for all questions, it's not a tool you can install or host.

It's part of stackexchange which is list of Q&A sites.

FYI, I've contacted the guys just to check what is the process to get such a site and here's their answer:

"
All of our sites are created through a process we call Area 51. It is the staging area to propose Stack Exchange sites to the community and, if it gains enough support, we create the site. Stack Exchange sites can only be created via the democratic, community-driven process at Area 51. You can read more about that process here: http://area51.stackexchange.com/faq.
"

Thanks
-Vincent

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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

vmassol
Administrator
One thing that I find really great and I would be totally in favor of doing something similar for xwiki.org:

"
Amass enough reputation points and Area 51 grant you additional privileges:

25 Propose example questions
50 Create proposals
50 Vote for questions as great examples
50 Flag proposals or example questions
50 Leave comments on example questions
150 Vote for questions as not a good example
250 Vote to close or reopen your proposals
1000 Edit other people's proposals and example questions
2000 Vote to close or reopen any proposal
10000 Delete questions and closed proposals; access to moderation tools
"

Let's see what we could come up with (imaginary scale I have no idea how easy/hard points are awarded by answering questions):

* 5000 allowed to add one issue to the roadmap for the next release ;)
* 50 ability to contribute a project in contrib repo
* 10000 ability to vote on project directions (binding votes)
* 100 right to close issues on jira
* 250 ability to get one's own free wiki on myxwiki.org (would be kind of cool I think - especially since it'll prove community interaction and thus the ability to ask the community for myxwiki support)

I'm sure we can find lots more.

WDYT?

Thanks
-Vincent

On Mar 21, 2011, at 2:58 PM, Vincent Massol wrote:

>
> On Mar 14, 2011, at 11:33 AM, Andreas Hahn wrote:
>
>> Am 14.03.2011 09:16, schrieb Vincent Massol:
>>> On Mar 13, 2011, at 10:00 PM, Andreas Hahn wrote:
>>>
>>>> Am 10.03.2011 17:39, schrieb Paul Libbrecht:
>>>>> Please contradict me!
>>>> Paul,
>>>> actually - how could I do this ?
>>>> I'm not an expert in forum software so I'd to go for the naive approach
>>>> - comparing features e.t.c.
>>>>
>>>> I was hoping for some insight that it is beneficial for the whole
>>>> project to encourage users first to browse and then to participate -
>>>> even if it means  for you and the others around here to give up beloved
>>>> habits.
>>>>
>>>> Anyway - I'm not going to push you guys back to the future of Web 2.0.
>>>>
>>>> Given the lame participation when compared to the survey 4 years ago it
>>>> seems to me that quite some people have already left the boat and it may
>>>> not matter anymore.
>>> I'm not sure how to read your last 2 paragraphs.
>>>
>>> Just note that fro my POV there's no "you" and "me" here. There's only a global community and you're part of it. That said at some point some people are going to need to work to make it happen, this is where the distinction will happen. How far are you willing to help? Maybe a first step would be that you help find either a forum software that fits the bill or a hosted service that would work for us.
>>>
>>>> From the people who answered so far my feeling is that:
>>> * people seem to agree in general that at least for users a forum would be nicer
>>> * since xwiki committers provide a substantial amount of answers to the user list as of today it would be nice that they can continue to have the information coming to me
>>
>> For my own FOSS project I'm hoping to start soon - I'll be going with http://stackoverflow.com. Providing support means checking the site for tagged questions a couple of times a day. It's just one mouse click. For me it makes no real difference in getting mails or checking a forum as long as you have a one-click list of open topics.
>
> [snip]
>
> Well, stackoverflow.com is one global site for all questions, it's not a tool you can install or host.
>
> It's part of stackexchange which is list of Q&A sites.
>
> FYI, I've contacted the guys just to check what is the process to get such a site and here's their answer:
>
> "
> All of our sites are created through a process we call Area 51. It is the staging area to propose Stack Exchange sites to the community and, if it gains enough support, we create the site. Stack Exchange sites can only be created via the democratic, community-driven process at Area 51. You can read more about that process here: http://area51.stackexchange.com/faq.
> "
>
> Thanks
> -Vincent
>

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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

Andreas Hahn
Am 21.03.2011 15:11, schrieb Vincent Massol:

> One thing that I find really great and I would be totally in favor of doing something similar for xwiki.org:
>
> "
> Amass enough reputation points and Area 51 grant you additional privileges:
>
> 25 Propose example questions
> 50 Create proposals
> 50 Vote for questions as great examples
> 50 Flag proposals or example questions
> 50 Leave comments on example questions
> 150 Vote for questions as not a good example
> 250 Vote to close or reopen your proposals
> 1000 Edit other people's proposals and example questions
> 2000 Vote to close or reopen any proposal
> 10000 Delete questions and closed proposals; access to moderation tools
> "
>
I like that too but I think the most compelling factor (about
stackoverflow) is that its pretty simple to identify the most important
information without too much reading and searching. Provided there are
enough answers at all the reputation score helps identifying the best
answers.  And with the  positive browsing experience as a user people
might be encouraged to help others too. I guess there are quite a few
active advisors that escape their routine jobs this way and share their
knowledge on some particular topic.

bye
Andreas

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Re: Drop mailing lists in favor of a forum software

Andreas Hahn
In reply to this post by vmassol
[snip]

> Well, stackoverflow.com is one global site for all questions, it's not a tool you can install or host.
>
> It's part of stackexchange which is list of Q&A sites.
>
> FYI, I've contacted the guys just to check what is the process to get such a site and here's their answer:
>
> "
> All of our sites are created through a process we call Area 51. It is the staging area to propose Stack Exchange sites to the community and, if it gains enough support, we create the site. Stack Exchange sites can only be created via the democratic, community-driven process at Area 51. You can read more about that process here: http://area51.stackexchange.com/faq.
> "
>
> Thanks
> -Vincent
>
>
Vincent et all,

did you notice at Area 51 there is a wiki Q&A site proposal in
commitment phase ?
I thought it won't hurt to commit over there although there a quite some
votes missing for that site getting created ...
Might be a bit too general though ...
http://area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/13716/wikis-and-wikipedia

bye
Andreas
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